Companions for the Journey

Chapter-a-Day Genesis 2

Then the Lord God said, “It is not good for the man to be alone. I will make a helper who is just right for him.” Genesis 2:18 (NLT)

I love the movie It’s a Wonderful Life. I know I’ve mentioned it on this blog before (probably multiple times). It’s one of the movies I could watch over and over again. No matter how many times I see it I can’t get through the ending without the tears welling up in my eyes and dripping down my cheeks. I love simple truths powerfully communicated, and I love when George Bailey opens up the copy of Tom Sawyer to find the inscription:

Dear George, Remember no man is a failure who has friends.

Alone-ness is not a good thing. We need companionship. We need fellowship. We need relationship. We need others walking beside us on our life’s journey. It is the way we were designed and wired by our Creator. We were created to know and be known and even God recognized that our life on this Earth would not be right without other human beings to share the experience. It is one of the first things we learn about humanity in God’s Message.

I am and have been blessed with good companions throughout my life’s journey, but my experience is that these relationships typically don’t just happen by chance.  The fruit of good relationship follows seasons of cultivating, plowing, planting, watering, feeding, weeding, and pruning. If we want authentic relationships then we have to prepare ourselves for it, we have to pursue it, and we have to be willing to give time for relationship to grow.

This morning I’m doing a little introspection. I’m thinking about and asking God to reveal to me the ways I can be better at relationships. The further I get in this journey the more I treasure and need meaningful relationships. It starts with me.

3 thoughts on “Companions for the Journey”

  1. “If we want authentic relationships then we have to prepare ourselves for it, we have to pursue it, and we have to be willing to give time for relationship to grow.” Often people our age give up on relationships. Too many failures, a sprinkle of bitterness, and lack of energy lead to cynicism, distrust, and ultimately loneliness. Thanks for your good word this morning Tom.

    1. You’re welcome, Scott. I was reading this morning that suicide rates in the U.S. are highest among adults between 40 and 50 (mostly men at a 4:1 ratio). I think it is a result of exactly the “giving up” you describe for the reasons you cite.

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