Wisdom is Knowing When to Call a Pro

Handymanda Tool Kit
(Photo credit: Earthworm)

Enthusiasm without knowledge is no good;
    haste makes mistakes. Proverbs 19:2 (NLT)

I come from a family of craftsmen. I’m very proud of this tradition. From my great-grandfather who started as a boy making wood dowels in South Holland and ended up running a hardware store in northwest Iowa, to my grandfather who taught shop class, my father who is a more than capable woodworker, and my brothers who make a living as craftsmen in artistic trades. I, however, didn’t fit into the mold. When it comes to home improvement and do-it-yourself projects, I confess my shortcomings. It’s not that I can’t do it. It’s just that I’m admittedly not very good at it. I only have to look at the nugget of King Solomon’s wisdom quoted above to understand why.

When it comes to do-it-yourself projects I don’t have a natural knack for it and I get impatient. I start out with enthusiasm and a gung-ho spirit, but I quickly find myself frustrated and wishing I was doing something else. If I run into an obstacle I push forward in an effort to “git ‘er done” instead of stopping and investigating the best way to proceed. A major mistake and several trips to the hardware store later, I’m even more frustrated and it’s cost me more time and money than anticipated. My return on investment for doing it myself starts to wear perilously thin.

I’ve learned over the years to accept certain truths about myself with humility. There are areas of life in which I am talented and gifted. There are areas of life that I am more than capable. There are areas of life that I am not as capable, and some things in life I should avoid like the plague.

Wisdom is knowing when to do-it-yourself and when to pay a professional.

 

[An index of all Tom’s chapter-a-day posts covering every book and chapter]

4 thoughts on “Wisdom is Knowing When to Call a Pro”

  1. 18 Discipline your children while there is hope.
    Otherwise you will ruin their lives.

    Our oldest is getting to the age where our discipline has changed. It’s less about “do this, not that” and more about life lessons and the consequences of behavior both good and bad. The difference is that he understands now and can reason and think. When he was little we had to set the boundaries for him, now he think through his own. We challenge him everyday to think about what he is doing, not just act impulsively.

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